Chronic Wasting Disease found in Medina County deer

 Hunting News, Texas Hunting  Comments Off on Chronic Wasting Disease found in Medina County deer
Jul 012015
 

Written by TPWD. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News

A two-year-old white-tailed deer in a Medina County deer breeding facility has been confirmed positive for Chronic Wasting Disease. This is the first case of CWD detected in captive white-tailed deer in Texas. CWD was first detected in Texas in 2012 in free-ranging mule deer in the Hueco Mountains in far West Texas.

The Medina County tissue samples submitted by the breeder facility in early June as part of routine deer mortality surveillance revealed the presence of CWD during testing at the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory in College Station. The National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed the findings on Tuesday, June 30.

An epidemiological investigation to determine the extent of the disease, assess risks to Texas’ free ranging deer and protect the captive deer and elk breeding industry is being led by the Texas Animal Health Commission, in coordination with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Veterinary Services.

Officials have taken immediate action to secure all cervids at the Medina County breeder facility with plans to conduct additional investigation for CWD. In addition, those breeder facilities that have received deer from the Medina County facility or shipped deer to that facility during the last two years are under movement restrictions and cannot move or release cervids at this time. TPWD is disallowing liberation of captive deer from all breeder facilities into the wild at this time pending further review. Additional measures to further minimize risk of CWD spreading into Texas’ free-ranging white-tailed deer herd, and to protect the captive deer breeding industry, will be considered.

“This is a terribly unfortunate development that we are committed to addressing as proactively, comprehensively, and expeditiously as possible.  The health of our state’s wild and captive deer herds, as well as affiliated hunting, wildlife, and rural based economies, are vitally important to Texas hunters, communities, and landowners.  As such, our primary objectives are to determine the source of the disease and to identify other deer breeding facilities and release sites that may have received deer from affected facilities,” said Carter Smith, TPWD executive director. “Working collaboratively with experts in the field we have developed protocols to address CWD, and our implementation efforts are already well under way.”

The TPWD and the TAHC CWD Management Plan will guide the State’s response to this incident. The plan was developed by the State’s CWD Task Force, which is comprised of deer and elk breeders, wildlife biologists, veterinarians and other animal-health experts from TPWD, TAHC, TVMDL, Department of State Health Services, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, and USDA.

Since 2002, the state has conducted surveillance throughout Texas for the disease. More than 34,000 samples collected from hunter-harvested and road kill deer have been tested for CWD.

Although animal health and wildlife officials cannot say how long or to what extent the disease has been present in the Medina County deer breeding facility, the breeder has had an active CWD surveillance program since 2006 with no positives detected until now.

“We are working with experts at the local, state and federal level, to determine the extent of this disease, and respond appropriately to limit further transmission,” said Dr. Andy Schwartz, TAHC Epidemiologist and assistant executive director. “Strong public awareness and the continued support of the cervid industry is paramount to the success of controlling CWD in Texas.”

Copyright 2015 Lone Star Outdoor News . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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 Posted by at 6:26 pm

Legendary duck call maker Milton “Butch” Richenback dies

 Hunting News, Texas Hunting  Comments Off on Legendary duck call maker Milton “Butch” Richenback dies
Jul 012015
 

Written by Conor Harrison, Lone Star Outdoor News, Photo from Facebook

RNT Calls announced this week the company’s founder, Harry Milton “Butch” Richenback, passed away on June 29 after a long battle with cancer.

“Today we lost one of the best call makers and calling instructors there has ever been,” said a statement on RNT Calls Facebook page. “He was a true craftsman and call building pioneer. His ability to strip down call instructions to its simplest form has been rivaled by none. Teaching more world champions than any man or woman alive. His belief in producing one call that could do it all, was his belief, passion and the foundations of what RNT has been built on. His passion for calling and call building, will be sorely missed.”

Visitation will be held on Wednesday, July 1st from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at Turpin Funeral Home in Stuttgart. Funeral services will be Thursday, July 2nd at First Baptist Church, Stuttgart at 10:00 a.m. with the burial at Lone Tree Cemetery in Stuttgart.

Copyright 2015 Lone Star Outdoor News . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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 Posted by at 2:48 pm

Dearman, Branum win Texas Shootout on Sam Rayburn

 Hunting News, Texas Fishing  Comments Off on Dearman, Branum win Texas Shootout on Sam Rayburn
Jun 302015
 

Written by Bass Champs

The TX Shootout on Sam Rayburn, presented by Bass Champs, was a huge success and the competition was tight. It was the 1st Annual event, and 238 teams signed up for a chance to win a portion of over $100,000 paid to the top teams. The top 29 teams received checks, and the winners enjoyed a whopping $50,000 payday!

The event was open to anyone who wanted a chance to win this kind of big money June 28 at the Umphrey Family Pavilion. Firestone & Robertson Distilling Company paired up with Bass Champs to ‘hook up’ with anglers and have a chance to bring product awareness to their TX Whiskey. Leonard Firestone, one of the founders of the distilling company was onsite to talk to the participants and the crowd.

The teams converged on Sam Rayburn to compete for the cash awards of over $100,000 given out. Mike Harman and Rick Sheen came in a little early, weighing in their 19.92 pound creel that included the Big Bass of the tournament weighing 9.10 pounds. Cody Wise and Cody Benson also weighed their sack in early, establishing initial tournament lead with their 22.46 pounds.

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Over the course of the weigh in, a total of 14 sacks more than the 20 pound mark were seen. Jason Hanks and Marc Woolems inched into the lead with 22.63 lbs, then were scantly beaten when Nick Albus and Donnie Robinson brought in their limit weighing 23.07. Later, the biggest sack of the day was seen when Brian Branum and Randy Dearman hefted their sack to their scales weighing 23.90 lbs to win the tournament.

“We just got lucky,” Dearman began. “We were flipping a Rage craw and a watermelon lizard way back in the bushes for our catch.”

Branum continued, “We fished a lot of stuff no one else was messing with.”

They had three nice fish and two 2 pounders in their sack.

“We didn’t think we had it with those two 2 pounders.”

They did, but only by 83/100ths of a pound! They were presented the guaranteed 1st place check for $50,000, and in addition were presented special etched bottles of TX Whiskey as their trophies.

“Those are the only two bottles of their kind in existence right now,” Leanord Firestone told them as he presented the trophies to them.

Nick Albus and Donnie Robinson held onto 2nd place with 23.07 lbs, garnering a $10,000 check.

“We were using a drop shot for our fish today,” Robinson stated. “But it wasn’t just any dropshot. It was the ‘Bubba’ power dropshot.”

Their Bubba dropshot consisted of 17# line, a 3/8 ounce weight and a 3/0 hook.

“We did lose one really good fish that was big enough to make the difference for us.”

Marc Woolems and Jason Hanks won 3rd place with their 22.63 lb limit. Jason gave Marc the credit for discovering their fruitful spot while pre-fishing for the tournament.

“We stayed there all day, using Texas-rigged Ol’ Monster worms in deep grass.”

They won $8,000 for their day.

Rounding out the top ten:

4th $5,000 22.46 lbs Cody Wise & Cody Benson
5th $3,000+ 22.28 lbs Chase Brooks & Cody Cartmel
6th $2,500+ 21.59 lbs Rusty Harvey & Chris Harvey
7th $2,000 21.33 lbs Ricky Collins & Johnny McKee
8th $1,600 20.87 lbs Mark Wilkinson & Clay West
9th $1,300 20.75 lbs Mark Mowery & Joe Mauldin
10th $1,150 20.59 lbs Kris Wilson & Charles Bebber
and last in the money….
29th $1,000 18.53 lbs James Davis Jr & Melvin Dunn

Big Bass – $1,000 9.10 lbs Mike Harman & Rick Scheen

Copyright 2015 Lone Star Outdoor News . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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 Posted by at 4:48 pm

New Rio Ammunition plant opens in Marshall

 Hunting News, Texas Hunting  Comments Off on New Rio Ammunition plant opens in Marshall
Jun 292015
 

Written by Conor Harrison, Lone Star Outdoor News

The Marshall Economic Development Corp., along with dignitaries from Rio Ammunition and its parent company, Maxam, members of the media and local citizens were treated to a tour of the newly-opened Rio Ammunition plant in Marshall on Thursday.

The state-of-the-art, 105,000-square-foot facility will produce 1,000,000 shotgun shells each day when it is up and running at 100 percent capacity, letting Rio fulfill North American customer orders in a fraction of the time it used to take.

The project broke ground in April, 2014, and will employ 90 full-time jobs in the Marshall area.

Read a full story on the grand opening in the next issue of Lone Star Outdoor News, available July 10.

Copyright 2015 Lone Star Outdoor News . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

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Monticello fishing great, Lake O’ the Pines tougher

 Hunting News, Texas Fishing  Comments Off on Monticello fishing great, Lake O’ the Pines tougher
Jun 292015
 

Written by Conor Harrison, Lone Star Outdoor News

Lone Star Outdoor News’ Operations Manager Mike Highs spent the weekend chasing largemouth bass on two lakes in northeast Texas — Monticello Reservoir and Lake O’ the Pines.

Hughs left the office Friday afternoon headed for a tournament with his local bass club — Century Bass Club — on Lake O’ the Pines. But not before a quick stop at Monticello, one of his favorite lakes in Texas.

Hughs said the lake was fishing well — the south end was 97.5 degrees. The power plant was not generating, but one stack was turned on, creating some current in the lake.

“I fished above the thermocline in 20 feet of water,” Hughs said. “I caught my fish in Carolina rigs — the trailer did not matter, I caught them on everything.”

Fishing in clear water, Hughs caught about 20 fish in three hours. The bass averaged around 3 pounds, with the biggest pulling the scales to 4.75 pounds. His biggest five went a shade over 20 pounds.

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On Saturday, a north wind blew and brought a small cold front to Pines.

Hughs said the bite got tougher during the weekend. He focused on top-waters early, getting multiple blowups but nothing would bite hard. He failed to hook a bass on his top-water Strike King Rage Shad.

Around 9:30, he moved to an area around the Highway 155 Bridge and started flipping shallow grass mats. From 9:30 until 11, he caught good fish on crawfish-patterned baits such as the Lake Fork Tackle Craw Tube.

“Most of the anglers stayed in the main lake and that is where the winning sack came from,” he said. “Fishing main lake humps, the winning angler caught 24-plus pounds on Saturday and another 18 pounds on Sunday in the same spot.”

Flipping was the dominate tactic used by most anglers in the tournament.

The stained water was around 88 degrees.

Copyright 2015 Lone Star Outdoor News . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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 Posted by at 7:30 pm

Nominations sought for Texas Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame

 Hunting News, Texas Fishing  Comments Off on Nominations sought for Texas Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame
Jun 292015
 

Written by TPWD

Individuals or organizations that have made a lasting contribution to freshwater fishing in Texas may be nominated through November 1 for induction into the Texas Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame.

The nominee must be a Texan or Texas organization. Individuals may be either living or deceased. Selection will be made by an independent committee; induction will take place during the annual Hall of Fame banquet at the Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center in Athens.

The most recent additions to the Hall of Fame are fishing guide Mark Stevenson and the Guadalupe River Chapter of Trout Unlimited.

Videos about prior inductees may be viewed in the Texas Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame at TFFC; some are also available on YouTube. Brief biographical sketches of past inductees and links to videos and the nomination form may be found at http://tpwd.texas.gov/spdest/visitorcenters/tffc/visit/virtualtour/halloffame/inductees.phtml.

Copyright 2015 Lone Star Outdoor News . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

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 Posted by at 2:24 pm

Stewards of the Wild hosts dinner in Dallas

 Hunting News, Texas Hunting  Comments Off on Stewards of the Wild hosts dinner in Dallas
Jun 262015
 

Written by Stewards of the Wild

Stewards of the Wild’s Dallas Chapter hosted young professionals at its 3rd Annual State of Conservation event on Tuesday, June 23, with cocktails, dinner and conversation about land, water and wildlife conservation in Texas and abroad.

Pete Delkus, Emmy Award-winning chief meteorologist at WFAA-TV, emceed the event with a panel of distinguished conservationists including Carter Smith, executive director of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Ivan Carter, international conservationist, hunter, and host of Hornady’s Africa and the Outdoor Channel’s Tracks Across Africa, and Justin Trail, current chair of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.

The event was held at Old Parkland’s Pecan Room with raffle items including an over and under shotgun from Ray’s Sporting Goods, Beretta Gallery merchandise, and a Yeti Cooler from St. Bernard’s Sports.

“I am so excited and proud to see this group of leaders coming together to transform the state of Texas … you are making a difference and helping to support resources like our Texas Game Wardens, who have had a simply spectacular response to recent flooding across the state, saving lives and helping hundreds in need,” Smith said.

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“When it comes to the outdoors, we have a lot to protect — a lot to be proud of,” Delkus said.

“We all need to get outside and experience wildlife — come to know and realize what an asset and gift it truly is,” Carter added.

“As for bobwhite quail, I’m very optimistic about their future in Texas — they look good, and they look healthy,” Trail said.

Copyright 2015 Lone Star Outdoor News . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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 Posted by at 2:59 pm

Houston Safari Club hires new marketing and events manager

 Hunting News, Texas Hunting  Comments Off on Houston Safari Club hires new marketing and events manager
Jun 242015
 

Written by HSC

Houston Safari Club is pleased to announce the appointment of Elizabeth Fersen as Marketing & Events Manager.

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Elizabeth is a 2010 graduate of the University of Georgia, Lamar Dodd School of Art, where she obtained her BFA in Studio Art and Interior Design.  While at the University of Georgia, she served as Captain of the Women’s Lacrosse Team.

Elizabeth brings experience to HSC in marketing, project management, catalog production, workflow design and implementation print production, graphic design, event design and customer service.

Most recently, Elizabeth was employed by The Orvis Company as Print Production Manager and subsequently Creative Services Project Manager.

Elizabeth will be responsible for HSC’s marketing and PR efforts. In addition, she will serve as the primary contact for HSC’s publications, merchandise and events management.

You may reach her at elizabeth@houstonsafariclub.org or (832) 831-6241.

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 Posted by at 3:45 pm

Crushing ivory (hopefully) not our best warfare

 Hunting News, Texas Hunting  Comments Off on Crushing ivory (hopefully) not our best warfare
Jun 232015
 

Written by Ben Carter, Dallas Safari Club. Photo by USFWS.

President Nixon was the first to declare war on drugs. Drug abuse, he said, is public enemy No. 1. He vowed more federal resources to prevent new addicts and rehab existing ones. That was 1971. One study estimates the U.S. now spends $51 billion annually on its drug war. And, by all accounts, drug abuse has skyrocketed.

A memorable line from a movie sums it up perfectly: “This can’t be a war. Wars end.”

Now we’ve declared war on poachers. Like Nixon, President Obama has promised more federal resources to prevent the indiscriminate killing and black-market trafficking of elephants, rhinos and other wildlife.

Like the war on drugs, the poaching war also is well intended.

But unless we move beyond silly political posturing and showmanship, it may be equally counterproductive.

The flagship in this war, so far, is publicly destroying ivory. As I write this on June 19, 2015, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials are proudly loading a full ton of raw elephant tusks, antique carvings and other seized ivory into a huge rock crusher parked in New York City’s Times Square. Because of the high-profile location, there is heightened bureaucratic pomp, photo ops and speechifying. Then someone will hit a switch and promptly convert $3 million worth of valuable animal-products into coarse dust.

Ironically, the agency is accepting proposals for re-purposing this dust into educational art projects or symbolic totems to help build public awareness of the plight of elephants.

How about pressing the crushed ivory into the shape of, say, an elephant tusk?

Destroying ivory, war generals claim, will “send a message.”

But what that message is, and who’s supposed to receive it, and how it might allegedly make a difference, isn’t exactly clear. Will Asian consumers, by far the biggest market for ivory, see a Twitter post about Times Square and suddenly rethink the material values of a thousand-year-old culture? Will the cartel traffickers have an abrupt change of heart? Will African triggermen decide to blow off tonight’s profits?

To me, the real message is loud and clear: Now more elephants must die to replenish the ivory stocks that we just destroyed for a publicity stunt.

Some law enforcement officials, particularly elected ones, also like to “send messages” by inviting the media and making a show out of setting fire to seized marijuana. We all know how effective that’s been in the war on drugs…

But at least no drug bust ever ends with officers burning a pile of seized cash.

Instead, valuable assets are converted to more and better law enforcement, and that’s a concept worth considering in the war on poachers. Saving an elephant tonight requires more and better game wardens. More good guys with guns will always discourage bad guys with guns, even in the African bush. And new but expensive technologies such as drones are proving effective in wildlife protection. But the Dark Continent simply doesn’t have a superpower bank account. More funding, instead of more unintelligible message sending, would have been meaningful.

Sport hunters walk the talk better than anyone else in Africa. Law enforcement efforts funded by hunters are among the best tools for sustaining wildlife populations against poachers. When managed hunting goes away, so do the animals. It’s a fact that too many animal lovers can’t seem to wrap their heads around.

So here’s a more elementary notion. Basic supply-and-demand principles suggest poaching would slow if ivory stockpiles were used to flood, rather than deny, the Asian markets.

If that happened today, some experts believe, Africa could produce enough ivory to meet world demand forever. Imagine African nations, with cooperation from U.S. and Chinese governments, effectively managing, regulating, harvesting, profiting from – and thus ensuring the future of – renewable natural resources. Sounds a lot like conservation.

Listen, I’m not ready to advocate legalizing drugs or free trade in ivory. The problems are more complex than that, and right now I doubt that either of those fixes would bring ideal ends to their respective wars.

But I am extremely confident that destroying elephant tusks isn’t part of the answer.

It just seems pointless.

Wildlife poaching is a serious threat. Taking it seriously should begin with a reality check, followed by international collaboration, resources and way smarter tactics. Surely we can do better than stupid publicity stunts.

 

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 Posted by at 2:30 pm

Bloodsport Pro Series FPS Hunter arrows make archers better shots

 Hunting News, Texas Hunting  Comments Off on Bloodsport Pro Series FPS Hunter arrows make archers better shots
Jun 222015
 

Written by BloodSport Archery.

BloodSport Pro Series FPS Hunter arrows are designed to help shooters overcome bow hunting’s biggest challenge – judging distance to the target. These flat-shooting, standard-diameter shafts allow hunters to use fewer sight pins and eliminate misses due to yardage differences.

Speed alone doesn’t create accuracy, so Pro Series FPS Hunter shafts feature tolerances so tight that the BloodSport engineering team was forced to design new testing procedures. The Pro Series raises the standard for hunting arrows. Simply put, they’re straighter and more tightly matched than any other hunting arrow out there.

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They include BloodSport’s proprietary Rugged Wrap construction process to create the ultimate hunting projectile with an incredible combination of speed, accuracy and toughness. Rugged Wrap creates a thicker carbon wall, resulting in extreme durability.

Pro Series FPS Hunter arrows also incorporate BloodSport’s game-changing Blood Ring technology, which takes the guesswork out of when to begin tracking.
Without affecting arrow flight, the super bright white, textured material of the Blood Ring captures blood as it passes through the animal. Different organs exhibit different blood textures and colors. Bright red, red with air bubbles, dark red or green/brown blood collects on the arrow and lets the hunter know what move to make next.
Pro Series FPS Hunter arrows come pre-fletched with 2″ Blazer vanes and are available in sizes 300 (9.1 grains per inch), 350 (7.9), 400 (7.4) and 500 (6.5).
Pro Series FPS Features:

  • Guaranteed straightness of +- .001″
  • Weight tolerance of just +- 1 grain
  • Rugged Wrap thick-wall construction for durability and accuracy
  • Fly Straight Technology ensures every arrow weighs and flies the same
  • BloodSport Blood Ring provides shot feedback
  • Pre-fletched with 2″ Blazer vanes
  • Flare nocks and inserts included

For more information on Pro Series FPS arrows and the complete line of quality Bloodsport shafts, go to www.bloodsport.co.

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